Glossary

The contact center glossary covers many of the most common vocabulary, measurements and technologies related to call center software and customer experience.

Quality Management

You need to capture the interactions between the call center representative and customer, whether voice or text, by recording those interactions in easily indexed and retrievable form.  Selected interactions are reviewed by trained quality experts who evaluate the quality of interactions based on an objective scoring process. Since people are required for scoring, there is inherently human subjectivity in the results. You can normalize each evaluator’s scores through a calibration process, driving consistency throughout the organization for scoring and coaching. Analytics tools will help quickly identify poor performers, best practices, recurring problems and key customer service experience details. Incorporating the voice of the customer through customer surveys and analytics will arm businesses with valuable information about individual and team quality performance, which will initiate coaching of agents to improve quality, and then return to recording new interactions to ensure that the quality has in fact improved.

With a good quality management process in place, you should be able to reduce callbacks, identify process improvement opportunities, facilitate actionable employee development, focus employee training efforts, and improve the overall performance of your contact center. No wonder most contact centers consider quality management to be the most fundamental and important of all workforce optimization components.

Unfortunately, there are often organizational barriers standing in the way of implementing a successful quality management process. Even experienced quality analysts have difficulty designing truly, objective quality evaluation criteria, and the process is manual at its heart, so there are sometimes inconsistent results. That creates an opening for doubters to challenge its credibility, so the contact center organization does not always fully “buy in” to the process. Also, without more extensive investigation, it’s often difficult to know whether an apparent quality problem is an individual agent issue, a team issue, a scoring issue, an evaluator issue, or no issue, and that creates additional organizational skepticism. When senior management does not fully support the process, resources are underfunded especially training for coaches/supervisors.

To learn more about a quality workforce management solution.